The Metabolic Syndrome in Children: What Might That Be?

Majid Ali, M.D.

 

Nearly one-half of American children are overweight. One-third of obese American children suffer from the metabolic syndrome with insulin resistance, increased levels of proinflammatory molecules (C-reacting protein), biomarkers of obesity (decreased levels of adiponectin), and biochemical indicators of significantly increased risk of cardiovascular and other degenerator problems.3 Where is this epidemic coming from? I believe the answer to that question is self-evident. First, our food items are depleted of nutrients. Second, our foods the standard American diet (SAD) are chemicalized. Third, we Americans simply eat too much. Lastly, many of us have lost spontaneity in our physical activities and exercise has become a cumbersome chore.

Strong evidence is emerging that the pandemic of the pandora’s box involving every metabolic, developmental, and hormonal facte of our children and adolescents originates in utero.3,4 Obesity the hallmark of hyperinsulinemia in most children5 is also accompanied with dyslipidemia in most instances,6 type 2 diabetes,7 and delayed (but now increasingly accelerated) cardiovascular complications.8-10 Between 1988 and 1994, among the U.S. adolescents included in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 6.8 percent among overweight adolescents and 28.7 percent among obese adolescents.11 Clearly that must be considered dated information since both the magnitude and the prevalence of childhood obesity have substantially increased in the past decade.12 Raised blood levels of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events in obese, insulin-resistant adults, whereas low adiponectin levels represent an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis.13,14

A brief comment may be made here of the definition of the metabolic syndrome. As long as the underlying energetic-cellular basis of the syndrome — cellular failure of oxygen homeostasis — is not recognized, one can expect that the definition of this so-called syndrome will continue to be updated by the year. That, indeed, is the case. The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel17 and the World Health Organization18 have recently revised diagnostic criteria (which, of course, make no sense fro an inegrative standpoint because dysoxygenosis-related disruptions are global in nature and will be documented as this area is investigated further wiith broader criteria.) It has been recognized that body proportions normally change during pubertal development and vary among persons of different races and ethnic groups. Thus, differences in waist-to-hip ratios may not interpret on their face values in children. The recent studies have been conducted on the basis of a threshold BMI z score of 2.0 or more, adjusted for age and sex.

Related Articles

* The Metabolic Syndrome in Children: What Might That Be?

* The Metabolic Syndrome in Adults: What Might That Be?

* Why Primary Physicians Should Not Ever Make the Diagnosis of the Metabolic Syndrome?

* Why Internists Should Not Ever Make the Diagnosis of the Metabolic Syndrome?

* Why Endocrinologists Should Not Ever Make the Diagnosis of the Metabolic Syndrome?

* Why Diabetes Specialists Should Not Ever Make the Diagnosis of the Metabolic Syndrome?

* Why Obesity Specialists mShould Not Ever Make the Diagnosis of the Metabolic Syndrome?

* Why Weight Loss Surgeons Should Not Ever Make the Diagnosis of the Metabolic Syndrome?

* Why Weight Loss Merchants Should Not Ever Make the Diagnosis of the Metabolic Syndrome?

 

This entry was posted in Cholesterol, Fermentation, Heart Health, Majid Ali MD, Oxygen Literacy, Unhealthy Food Choices and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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